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Jaden S. Thompson

Arts Chair Jaden S. Thompson can be reached at jaden.thompson@thecrimson.com

Latest Content

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Music

Concert Review: Stromae Brings a ‘Multitude’ of Genres to Boston

The multi-hyphenate artist stopped by Boston University for the last date of the U.S. leg of his “Multitude” tour, named after his latest album.

Woman of the Year Jennifer Coolidge
Arts

Jennifer Coolidge Honored as 73rd Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year

It was only 12 degrees outside in Harvard Square on Feb. 4, but dangerously freezing temperatures didn’t stop die-hard Jennifer Coolidge fans.

Damien Chazelle on "Babylon" Set Image
Film

Damien Chazelle ’07 on His New Movie ‘Babylon’ and His Experience Studying Film at Harvard

The Harvard Crimson interviewed Damien Chazelle ahead of the release of “Babylon,” discussing his inspiration for the story as well as his experience studying film at Harvard.

Jaden and Sofi
Arts

Editors' Note: To Our Friends

A note from the Arts Chairs of the 149th Guard of The Harvard Crimson.

Jaden S. Thompson Vanity Image
Arts

Arts Vanity: A Playlist for When You Miss the Quad Shuttle, But It’s All Songs from the ‘Shrek’ Franchise

Here is a carefully curated playlist of songs to listen to when the Quad-Yard Express pulls away when you are just a few yards away from the door.

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On Campus

The Hidden History of Slavery at Christ Church: Nicole Piepenbrink on Her Film ‘HERE LIES DARBY VASSALL’

In the hustle of their daily commutes, most of those who pass by Cambridge’s Christ Church do so without a second glance. The average passerby has no idea there is a tomb in the basement holding the remains of a formerly enslaved person. His name was Darby Vassall.

Jacob Collier Photo
Music

Jacob Collier Concert Review: Rising Star Connects With His Audience In Boston

Collier's concerts are not just about showing off his wide-ranging talents, but about fostering meaningful engagement with his audience.

“Holy Spider" Still
Film

From Cannes: ‘Holy Spider' is a Grim Depiction of Patriarchal Violence

With Amir-Ebrahimi bold and arresting performance at the foreground, Abassi’s film is an unflinchingly grim depiction of the toll of patriarchal violence.

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Film

From Cannes: ‘Stars at Noon’ is a Well-Acted Yet Muddled Thriller-Romance

Denis’s latest effort is commendable for its exciting pace and distinctively sultry mood, but the romance at the core of the film is not strong enough to fully draw audiences into the muddled world of its underwritten protagonists.

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Film

From Cannes: 'Les Pires' Examines the Ethical and Personal Sides of Filmmaking

Writer-directors Lise Akoka and Romane Gueret craft a self-aware film that features sensitive performances, a touching emotional arc, and compelling commentary on the social responsibilities of filmmakers.

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Film

From Cannes: ‘Syk Pike’ is an Over-the-Top, Amusing Look at Narcissism

Though oftentimes over-the-top and surface level in its critique, “Syk Pike” is nevertheless a witty examination of narcissism, unabashedly holding up a mirror to humanity’s worst tendencies.

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Film

From Cannes: 'Frère et Sœur’ Takes Sibling Rivalry to the Extreme

Arnaud Desplechin’s latest film begins by thrusting viewers right in the middle of a hostile, tragic confrontation and maintains approximately the same level of melodrama for the entirety of its runtime.

"Close" Still
Film

From Cannes: ‘Close’ is a Heart-wrenching Portrayal of Boyhood Friendship

The film unravels into a complicated portrait of friendship and grief, illustrating with devastating poignancy how love and loss are inextricably linked.

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Film

From Cannes: ‘Aftersun’ is a Gorgeous, if Oblique, Portrait of Nostalgia

Charlotte Well's feature film debut is a deeply felt examination of familial connection, with all of its joys and complications.

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Film

From Cannes: ‘Plan 75’ is Haunting and Life-Affirming

Chie Hayakawa's latest paints a somber picture of old age, with a few pinpoints of hope interspersed throughout a slowly paced but artfully shot film.

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