The blog of The Harvard Crimson

Flyby Loves: Our Seniors

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{shortcode-e17dac1fa1f72458998569b437d2fcdc9a54ea18}Title says it all. Thank you to our senior writers for being amazing in every way — we're always looking up to y'all. :-)

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Flyby Loves Rocket S. Claman

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Thanks for "Can I tell a story?" at meetings, being able to write both sap and snark with ease, always being ready to roast HUDS vegan options, and holding it down as our resident Theatre Kid.

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Claire J. Hoffman

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Thanks for showing us what a committed relationship to iced coffee looks like, somehow balancing a million things (anyone heard of Immunology Club?) and looking good while doing it, being a great comp director for, like, five years in a row, and actually being down to grab a meal sometime, despite your terrifying GCal.

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Hannah J. Humes

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Thanks for writing pieces that are quite literally too funny to publish, rants that never fail to entertain, being a competent driver (please don't go we need you), and teaching us how to both throw and catch ass.

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Sahara W. Kirwan

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Thanks for keeping flyby afloat during post-eviction life, having an impeccable sense of style, bringing ~warmth~ to meetings with your presence, and being the only Kirwan whose emails don't break my heart (no shade to The Leslie).

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Linda Lee

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Thanks for the best hot takes, having a laptop with so many fun stickers to look at during meetings, entertaining us with updates on your love/hate relationship with CS, and always bringing chaos to the Sanctum.

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Cindy Li

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Thanks for being a punderful human being, surviving the study abroad fiasco of century, teaching us the true meaning of "envy" through a *perfect* Instagram feed, and elevating the art of the "How To:" piece.

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Lorenzo F. Manuali

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Thanks for being a great chair, providing kickass pasta dinners, looking good in a catsuit, being Italian (probably — he is, right?), and a laugh that brightens up every meeting.

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Trula J. Rael

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Thanks for being a cool mom, caring deeply about quality snack foods, being the best River Run host, and patient edits in Lev Dhall.

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We love you!

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Flyby Loves Ben S. Rhee

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Thanks for being a cryptid. Enough said. ;)

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We love you!

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Good luck out there! Don't be strangers. :,)

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How To: Spice Up Reading Period

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{shortcode-58b6b0960fb582c95282485e6d7e7fc8a3f89b3b}It’s the end of the semester. You’ve watched the past few months flyby (pun intended) and it somehow feels as though you’ve done absolutely nothing with your time aside from testing the limits of your Zoom lecture attention span or analyzing the optimal level of procrastination. Luckily, flyby is here to add a little thrill to your life with 7 ways to spice up the last few weeks of the semester.

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1. Turn in a final project 5 or more days before it’s due

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Let’s face it, procrastination is inevitable…take this as your calling to change things up. Have you ever turned in an assignment (much less a final) not one minute, but five days before it’s due? We didn’t think so. Perhaps it’s finally your time to shine — not only will you get it over with and avoid that feeling of an impending deadline looming over you, but this may quite literally become the greatest flex of your college career.

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2. Take a full day off. Like actually take the day off.

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You say you haven’t gotten any work done today, but is that really true? Even if you haven’t physically cracked anything out, there’s a 99 percent chance you either feel guilty about not having done enough, or couldn’t get the prospect of work out of your head. Try taking a full day off and give yourself a chance to recharge after what’s been one of the most challenging years for the world. Whether this means spending a day exploring nature, practicing retail therapy, or even watching TikTok for 6 hours straight (let’s just pretend you don’t do this on the regular for the sake of this article) and forget about your responsibilities to recenter yourself so you can finish off the semester strong!

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3. Actually keep up with your sleep schedule

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This might be the most chaotic of them all. Imagine having a consistent and reasonable sleep schedule where you’re not falling asleep at the crack of dawn and waking up midway through lecture (or even worse, a final exam). Try keeping up with a ~reasonable~ sleep schedule and you might even find it boosts your productivity and alertness. At least give it a shot. We know it’s a bit of a hard task, but you wanted cHaOtiC sPiCe in your life right??

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4. Channel your alter ego

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Swap your wardrobe to its complete opposite for one week. Do what you gotta do: thrift, steal clothes from your parents, siblings, and friends, or even dig out your clothes living in the back of your garage from four years ago before you underwent a ~transformative experience~. Chaos. Activated.

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5. Stay unmuted throughout an entire Zoom meeting

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Seeking maximal chaos? Look no further. Staying unmuted for an entire Zoom meeting may quite well be one of the riskiest, most anarchic activities one may take on. A hyperactive dog who barks non stop may be the least of your worries. You never know just how much you need something until it’s gone.

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6. Speak exclusively with a foreign accent for the next few weeks

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Now, there are two options for this one. Option 1: you speak with an accent you’ve already mastered to the point that it sounds natural, and people are incredibly thrown off by your sudden change in identity. Option 2: you speak exclusively with a very poorly executed accent that makes people wish they had the option to mute you, both digitally and irl. Take your pick and let us know how it goes!

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7. Go Skydiving

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Because. Why. Not.

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Anywho, we hope you’re inspired by at least a few of these and are able to make the last few weeks of this semester just a bit (or a lot) more exciting. Remember to take it easy and give yourself a break, especially after this past year. Good luck with finals everyone! <3

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How To: Class of 2025 Intro Blurb

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{shortcode-456b9b0a570ef8b1230d881cd462538b86e46d4e}Decision day was Monday. So, congratulations on finally committing to the most ~transformative~ experience of your life, Class of 2025. Now that you can officially say that you are #HarvardBound, you might want to start thinking about how to humble brag while introducing yourself on social media. Nervous? Don’t be. Flyby is here to make sure your Harvard intro blurb will leave a lasting and good impression to your future classmates with the dos and don’ts in writing it.

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Don’t: Brag about your other acceptances

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We get it, you’re smart and had a very successful college admission season. Still, that doesn’t mean we want to hear how you got accepted to every single school you applied to. You’ll just seem like an arrogant showoff. Who cares if you got into all 8 Ivies and Stanford? We’re all going to the same school now.

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Do: List your interests and hobbies

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At the end of the day, you’re writing these intro posts to connect with your future classmates and make some friends over the summer. So make sure to list your hobbies and interests. Is there a K-drama that you’re currently obsessed with? Include it. Chances are someone is also interested in the same show and you just got yourself a new watch buddy.

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Don’t: Link your LinkedIn profile

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Maybe this is just a personal preference, but I always scoff when people drop their LinkedIn in their bio. It’s just the social media version of showing off your resume. Do you really want to be that person?

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Do: Include your other social media

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With that said, Facebook posts aren’t the best way to keep in touch with people. So do make sure to include your Insta, Snapchat, and even TikTok, and prepare to make some new friends!

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Don’t: Be weirdly passive aggressive about your past

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Not all of us had a great high school experience. Still, it always rubs me the wrong way when people rant about their terrible experiences in high school or even during the college admission season in their intro post. It’s TMI and just weird.

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For the first impression, let’s just stick to good vibes.

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Do: Be Short and Concise

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I’m sure you are all very excited to get to know each other. But I guarantee you, no amount of enthusiasm will make people willing to read an entire essay about some random people they’ve never met before in real life. So keep your blurb short and sweet and save your big brain juice for the writing placement exam.

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Once again, welcome to your home for the next four years, Class of 2025! We hope this list offers some good advice for you to create your quintessential Harvard announcement post. Though tbh, don’t stress about it. These intro burbs are supposed to be fun and relaxing. And even if you mess up, you will have another chance to make a first impression during orientation!

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Roving Reporter: Housing Day Reactions

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{shortcode-8fa40be48fe5c14470fd12d4dc847cbffb578741}Each spring Harvard first-years are sorted into one of twelve upperclassmen houses, where they will spend their next three years. We set out across the Yard to see how the Class of 2024 reacted to the results of this year's virtual Housing Day.

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Check it out on the Crimson’s Youtube channel (and send your Quad & Kirkland friends some love)!

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Email Send Offs as the Ivy League

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{shortcode-b21d2e2feade3d2ac2847b84cab90f271ad4e8b6}Although the eight Ivy League schools boast diverse student bodies, each still has their own unique characteristics and identity. Thus, using a comprehensive Google search to analyze Harvard and its seven Ivy League siblings, Flyby presents the definitive list of Ivy League schools as email send offs.

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Harvard – "Best,"

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The email version of the infamous brag: “I go to a small liberal arts college outside of Boston.” While this send off doesn’t really mean that we are proclaiming our superiority in our email correspondence, it is a subtle way to remind people that Harvard students are the ~best~. ;)

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Yale – "My Best,"

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In an effort to one-up Harvard a la Veritas versus Veritas et Lux, you can expect Yale’s email send off to be similar to Harvard in a totally not suspicious at all way. Hence, instead of the simple “Best,”, it is now “My Best,”.

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Princeton – "Sincerely Yours,"

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It’s the classic email send off. While effective and professional, it’s also boring, preppy, and forgettable. Basically Princeton.

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Columbia – "xoxo, Gossip Girl"

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Enough said.

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Brown – "Sending Good Vibes," or "Peace,"

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The perfect email send off for the Hippie School of the Ivy League. Brown is known for being the chill and socially-conscious Ivy. Good vibes all around.

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UPenn – "I look forward to hearing from you at your earliest convenience."

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This gives off business, professional, but also sliiiightly demanding vibes. Thus, it’s perfect for the heartless future Wall Street bankers from the Wharton School of Business.

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Dartmouth – "Cheers,"

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The only send off that truly captures the spirit of Keggy the Keg. Besides, considering Hanover’s location in the middle of nowhere, maybe this is how Dartmouth students stay happy: By constantly reminding themselves to “cheer up!” Or maybe they’re genuinely having a great time out in Somewhere, NH? The world may never know.

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Cornell – "Sent from my iPhone"

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Is “Sent from my iPhone” even an email send off? Anyways, it’s perfect for everyone’s favorite “Fake Ivy.”

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Although often lumped together, all eight Ivy schools have unique vibes in their own right. We hope seeing them as different types of email send offs gives you a taste of what each school is truly all about!

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Flyby Tries: Journaling Everyday For A Week

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{shortcode-28f06642a03b1c5bbe26c6731390f8c9c3f8c4f0}Ahh, journals. The perfect place for pre-teen nostalgia of middle school crushes, high school teenage angst of hating everyone, college rants, vents, and emotional breakdowns. Be it a bullet, digital, or normal journal, journals are always there for you. Journaling die-hards (journal-hards??) promise it improves mental health and emotional stability, so I decided to try journaling for a week to see how it impacts my ~mental health~.

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Pre-Journal Thoughts

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I journal at irregular intervals, as a way to brain dump all the things racing through my mind, especially when I’m overwhelmed. With finals looming and the end of semester rush, my Gcal looks like a rainbow vomited all over it. In true overachiever fashion, I added another thing to my to-do list. However, my mental health is important so I thought I’d kill two birds with one stone — journal and write a Flyby piece about it. Because of course, nothing is real unless it goes on the internet.

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Monday:

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After I snatched this idea off Flyby’s Monday slot, I knew I had to start right away. I have a basic black notebook I use to write to-do lists in, which I figured would do. It took me way longer than I’m willing to admit to find a pen that actually works. After I hunted down a pen, I sat down at 2:30 a.m. (so technically Tuesday, but whatever) to journal. Monday was a very long day for me, with last-minute cramming for my math midterm on Tuesday, writing Harvard Today, collecting data for my Psychology class project due on Saturday, a group meeting, and other stuff. So I quickly scribbled down some thoughts, rolled over, and promptly fell asleep.

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Tuesday and Wednesday:

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On Tuesday, I journaled immediately after my math midterm hoping that releasing all my stress on paper would help, and maybe I would discover why the exam made it seem like I’ve never attended a math class. I did feel much better afterward, but the fat four hour nap I took after probably helped.

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Wednesday’s journalling sesh was filled with ~main character energy~. A bright sunny day, I dragged myself outside, made a little fruit salad and smoothie, and wrote away with my cat sleeping on the picnic blanket beside me. It was very quarantine picnic girl vibes and you know I had to take a picture for the gram to prove it.

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Thursday and Friday

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Thursday was a jam-packed day. With two classes, two sections, and one meeting, I was looking at a six hour Zoom day. In between my Gen Ed class and section, I journaled outside under the starry night sky. This may sound very sappy, but trust me!! Go out and stargaze tonight — you’ll feel all your anxieties floating away into space as you realize how insignificant we are in this vast universe. I felt so much lighter after journalling. I was energized and rejuvenated, and somehow I didn’t need six coffees to stay awake that day.

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Saturday and Sunday

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I stayed up all night on Saturday working on my Psychology paper, so by the time 6:59 a.m. East African Time (ie 11:59 EDT) rolled around, I simply could not look at any more words and I didn’t journal. After sleeping for 10 hours straight on Sunday, I treated myself to a vanilla iced latte (sigh, another coffee) at a cute little cafe, put on my favorite jazz lofi playlist and journaled for over an hour. This was truly the highlight of my week and I may have stayed there three more hours to watch the beautiful sunset go down.

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After much reflection on my week, I can attest that journaling is amazing. I always thought I needed an aesthetic journal with AmandaRachLee vibes, but my little ole’ black notebook did pretty well. The catharsis that is word vomiting into a journal is unparalleled. Getting all the words, thoughts, and emotions off your chest actually feels like a burden being lifted. I definitely will continue to journal, not every day but as much as possible. Journaling gets a Flyby golden star of approval and we hope you try it out! All the best, and may your thoughts be filled with sunshine and puppies. Signing off, XOXO flyby girl ;)

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Flyby Everywhere: First-Year International Program

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{shortcode-60ff764e0325f678350f0fe85b384913cb112353}Even before the pandemic began, being an international student has always been challenging. America is already weird to Americans. Imagine what it feels like for international students to suddenly have to worry about sales tax, Fahrenheit, as well as the Boston accent *shudder*. Thankfully, for the 12.2 percent of students admitted to Harvard every year who are from abroad, the First-Year International Program is here to help. Flyby chatted with Yousuf A. Bakshi ’23, FIP’s pre-orientation co-director, about all his best FIP mems & advice.

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ATQH: Can you tell us a little bit about the history of FIP?

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YAB: FIP has existed for many, many, many years now. It’s been one of the most pivotal pre-orientation programs at Harvard. It helps acclimate all these international students to a brand new country and a brand new campus, basically. It’s one of the OG, one of the big dogs. We have a very large cohort every year of around 150 international students who are so eager and excited to join not only campus, but to join a new international community on campus.

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They’ll be joined by 45 student leaders who are so excited, motivated, and determined to make those students’ journey to Harvard an amazing success. Not only do we help with setting up a cell phone or bank account, but we also do really fun events where we introduce them to American culture. So we teach them how to do different American dances or we teach them how to acclimate to America, while also learning more about Harvard’s culture and learning how to be their best selves at Harvard. Many of the academic programs at Harvard are very different from what they are used to back home, so we will help with the transition to a new education curriculum, a new working environment, a new way of life on campus. That’s why it’s an amazing program, because FIP will really help you with your transition to Harvard and your transition to a new country.

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ATQH: How and why did you get involved in FIP originally as a pre-frosh? Is there an application process for students who want to choose FIP as their pre-orientation experience?

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YAB: So, when I first got accepted to Harvard, the first thing I did was look at the FIP website. I was very excited but also was very nervous about moving to a new country, so I wanted to see if there’s anything available for international students before I made the commitment to move to Harvard and moved to a new country. FIP was the first resource that I saw. I was probably a bit too eager. Like the day after the acceptance, I looked at the FIP website and went through all of the FIP leaders’ bios, read all about FIP. I even sent an email to FIP leaders asking “How do I apply to FIP?” and they told me that registration would open in May, so around six months after I got in.

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And it would be the same thing this year for FIP registration. FIP is actually not an application and just a registration. So every international student or a student who is from the US but lives overseas will receive an email, and that email will tell them that they have been invited to FIP and registration will open in the summer. And in August, you will be put into your families and FIP will begin! It’s a very, very fun experience, and it all begins in the summer when registration opens.

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ATQH: Whoa, you don’t need to apply for FIP? That is so nice.

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YAB: Yeah, we believe that international students should take FIP and I mean, we don’t want to put any barriers in their way. So we just want to know exactly who they are when they register and then if they’re international students then yeah, they’re gonna get FIP. FIP is for every international-experienced student, so we encourage them all to come.

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ATQH: How long is FIP?

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YAB: We don’t exactly know how it would be this year as we’re still planning it, but typically FIP has always been four days — but last year, it turned into two weeks! We’re definitely going to have a longer program, we’re not gonna have four days anymore, because we feel like it’s not enough honestly to acclimate to Harvard in four days. So we’re going to try to get a longer FIP period because we found it to be much more fun, encouraging, exciting, motivating to have a longer experience. We haven’t planned exactly for this year just quite yet, but expect it to be as great as ever.

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Actually, last year before Covid struck, FIP was actually given the go-ahead to be longer! So we were going to have a week of FIP in the dorms, and that was gonna be the longest FIP we’ve ever done on campus as well. So that was gonna be really exciting. But unfortunately Covid struck, and it became two weeks… but those weeks were online. So we had to balance out the time to make sure that each day wasn’t as draining on Zoom.

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ATQH: What do you think is the impact of FIP on international students, both in typical year and during a virtual experience?

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YAB: So, in a typical year, FIP provides international students with the fundamental information for a happy, successful start at Harvard, which includes sessions and discussions about American culture, immigration, and academics in the US and at Harvard. So it really helps them to get to know what it’s like to actually be here and how to socialize with American before actually socializing with Americans because of the many different quirks and things Americans do that might weird international students out. So we make sure that they know all the acronyms, all the slang words, and also how to properly interact and how to be their best self academically. So that’s what FIP typically does: it creates a community where they can get to know how to be their best selves on campus.

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This last year, FIP’s meaning took on a whole new level when international students weren’t allowed on campus — because they were the only cohort of students who are basically barred from entering America, let alone campus, they were very excluded. We could see that many of the Class of 2024 were making friendship groups without international students included because they weren’t on campus, and a lot of international students felt left out and didn’t feel like they had a place because they weren’t allowed on campus. So FIP’s meaning took on a whole different level because FIP provided all these international students who felt excluded with a community of themselves where they can interact and socialize with people who are in the exact same position as them. Because of the amazing, wonderful leadership of the FIP leaders and the collaborative environment that FIP was, that was one of the biggest parts of FIP 2020: getting us this community so they could prosper outside of FIP.

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ATQH: What are some of the events that FIP does during the school year to make sure that the connections between FIPpers remain?

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YAB: So one of the biggest things that happen is your FIP family will have reunions all the time. I remember my freshman year, we always hung out with our leaders in their dorms and we had a great time. Once every month, we had FIP dinners and then online we had FIP reunion Zoom calls, so it’s been a really great way to keep in contact, get to know how they’re doing and how they’re progressing. FIP-wide, we have a big reunion event mid-year where every FIPper comes back together to see the rest of FIP and all the leaders are there to congratulate them on completing their first semester and see how everybody is doing.

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FIP doesn’t end after the one week of pre-orientation. FIP is the experience. FIP is your first year at Harvard. FIP is your community. It transcends the week of pre-orientation beyond your wildest imagination, because it’s like you have a home for the year. And not even just a year though because many, many FIPpers then go on to be FIP leaders, because they want to give back to this amazing community and they want to help new international students succeed. So for me, FIP has been a part of my life for the past two years now. It’s not a week, it’s a lifestyle.

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And for the Class of 2024, when they come back to campus, we’re setting up a new semi-orientation to help those 2024 students acclimate to campus because they’ve never been. So FIP will happen again for them in a different way. So FIP always exists on some levels and some capacity throughout the year, and Covid has and will not change that. There’s always a community to help you.

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ATQH: Do you have any fun memories of FIP?

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YAB: I would say my best and funniest moment of FIP was meeting my FIP family… We had a massive dance competition at 10 p.m. in Eliot courtyard where we’d dance to the end — each family presented their dances, and it was so funny because we’d see one team did the Anaconda and were twerking like there was no tomorrow, and another team did the worm. And then our team, we did just such funny dances and it was just so funny seeing every team make a fool of themselves in front of everybody because it shows we’re all so comfortable being here and being together in this community and just showing our funny sides off. And that was a moment that struck me because I was like, “Wow, this really is my community at Harvard. This really would be my home and we’re so open with each other.”

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And for last year, I really enjoyed the coffee chats because we’re able to connect one-on-one with every single student. Each FIPper was able to connect with another FIPper and have a coffee chat together where they got to ask further questions to get to know each other, which is this really cool way to get on a deeper level and loads of connections were made that way. I remember making such funny connections and really deep, heartfelt connections. Yeah, it was just a really fulfilling experience and that’s something I definitely want to see again this year because we never did that before. We did it last year and it was so fulfilling, rewarding, and amazing to hear everybody’s stories and it’s a moment that really struck me last year.

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ATQH: Describe FIP in three words.

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YAB: Exhilarating, transformative, and community-building.

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ATQH: Which Harvard House do you think embodies the spirit of FIP the most?

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YAB: I would say FIP represents the Quad because we are different to American students, so we don’t have the shared experiences that many of the River Houses have — we don’t really interact with American students like that, we haven’t gone through their experiences… so we might feel distant from American students. But yet because of that, we’ve built a community within ourselves — we have our own international community, which is so powerful and so great because we get to know each other on a much more personal level, and it’s such a friendly and warm community like the Quad, where everyone knows each other. And I would say that really embodies the spirit of FIP, because we are so connected to each other as international students.

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Housing Market 2021: Dudley Community

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{shortcode-9b0353102359f9ed84b610a55ec07d3d355e998b}It’s not an entryway, not a House, but a community! The Dudley Community! Dudley includes the Mass Ave. and Sacramento St. Co-operatives and some students living off-campus or outside the Harvard House system. They’re practically self-run and call all of Cambridge and Boston their “home.” If you’re looking for that truly #independent experience but want to gain an amazing community at the same time, Dudley is the place for you!

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What is Dudley?

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Dudley is a *community* consisting of both students who live off-campus and students who live in the Dudley Co-op — their on-campus, student-run, Harvard-overseen house. Any interested students can transfer from their Harvard House to Dudley starting their sophomore year. Those interested in the Co-op apply to join a waitlist for one of the roughly 30 spots. Once accepted, students are quickly integrated into the community through Dudley-only traditions and events, including everything from cooking together nightly to a ~special~ annual study break!

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Quirks & Perks

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Despite its widespread geography, Dudley’s community tends to revolve around the Sacramento Street Co-op, a large house that houses about 15 students. There you can expect to celebrate Valentine’s on Halloween and get married to one another (jkjk… unless) on Easter! When it comes to traditions, Dudley likes to be... unconventional. While other students celebrate Primal Scream, Dudley stays a little less primal with the Lingerie Study Break, where they go to Lamont Library in their underwear. The community warmth extends from formal get-togethers to casual inside jokes about Kenny G, their “unofficial official mascot”. Their embrace of the unexpected is what makes Dudley an always evolving and exciting community — as David J. Sabot ’22, Dudley HoCo Chair, put it, “Generally not keeping traditions has always been a tradition.”

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Speaking of HoCo, while Harvard Houses have typical HoCo roles like Secretary and Social Chair, Dudley keeps it spicy. Within their housing committee, each member is given a unique title, ranging from Steward of Life and Secretary of Agriculture, to Star, for the member who is in charge of getting snacks from Star Market. Clearly, if you’re looking for a niche, you’ll find it in Dudley! But arguably the best part of Dudley is its people, who all chose to be a part of the community and clearly have a lot of love for it.

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Staying Connected

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No matter who you are, you can find the right level of community at Dudley. Do you want to see other members every day and have dinner together? Join the Co-op! Are you fiercely independent, but still want to occasionally stop by for community events? Live off-campus! Dudley is a choose-your-own-adventure book!

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Even with Harvard online, Dudley’s community is active and engaged, and consistently meets over Zoom, organizes within the Cambridge community, and (safely) drives together to check out farm shares. On the virtual Dudley community, HoCo Treasurer Lauren G. Fadiman ’21 said, “We’re having shared experiences, and Dudley is a lot of people doing their own thing in a cool way.”

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Once students return to campus in the fall, Dean Laura Chivers’ office is often the place to find and connect with the Dudley community. According to Secretary of Agriculture Elliot J. Schiff ’21, the Dudley community stays connected when "running into each other in Dean Laura’s office, the last day you can get classes approved for pass/fail. I ran into no fewer than three friends that day.”

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And for those of you that missed it, check out Dudley’s Housing Day 2021 video, a true testament to their virtual community! Only a month late, here’s Flyby’s take on the piece of art:

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Kenny G <3 (This is your clickbait sign to stop everything and go watch this masterpiece to join the enlightened few who understand the immaculate Kenny G reference). We’ll leave the review at that and let you bask in the glory of Dudley for yourself (and strongly consider transferring like every writer on Flyby). Seriously, go watch. Like, now.

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{shortcode-ca91431f6425c0fde8f63a8942a154bb4fdec59b}

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All About Housing

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There are a variety of ways to approach housing as a Dudley member. You can live and eat off-campus, you can live and eat in the Co-op, or you can live off-campus and occasionally stop in for a meal. Off-campus (non-Co-op) housing can take a multitude of forms, and students usually rent out their own place.

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The Co-op’s accommodations are a little more structured. There are not one, but two Co-op’s: Sacramento Street and Massachusetts Avenue. Sacramento St. used to be a bed and breakfast, so it hosts an industrial kitchen and a number of common room social spaces, whereas Massachusetts Ave. is purely residential. Each Co-op site houses about 15 people at a time, and they’re both about as far from the Yard as the Quad.

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Central to the Co-op’s semi-independent living is shared responsibilities to maintain your space and feed each other. Now, cooking and cleaning for yourself may sound like a step up from the convenience of dining hall conveyor belts, but overall they really work to build community within the Co-op’s and Dudley overall! The Co-op’s chore system ensures accountability, where each member completes their chores for points, a certain number of which must be earned every two weeks. Those who live off campus can complete the chores to have dinner in the Co-op.

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Speaking of food, because Dudley cooks its own meals, it’s especially great if you’re vegan or not the biggest fan of HUDS food. Fadiman, Sabot, and Schiff’s favorite Dudley meals include “zhuzhed up” leftovers — i.e. ~elevated~ leftovers and vegan pizza. And at the heart of the food they make is an effort to be sustainable.

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Your Questions, Answered

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Want to know even more about everyone’s favorite housing ~community~? Fadiman, Sabot, and Schiff have you covered!

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If Dudley was an ice cream flavor, what flavor would it be?

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DJS: I feel like it would be frozen yogurt of some kind, not ice cream.

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Stay quirky, y’all. :-)

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Is the misconception that Dudley is competitive housing true?

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EJS: Dudley tends to have a lot of students that are off-cycle, even before the pandemic, so if there happens to be a large wave of off-cycle students that are returning then it might be harder [to get a room]. But it’s truly, if there’s a room available for you, you can go—

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LGF: Right away.

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EJS: Yeah, even mid-semester.

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LGF: You can join as soon as you’re a sophomore.

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What are three words you would use to describe Dudley?

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LGF: The. Dudley. Community. :)

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Mysterious… You’ve left us intrigued.

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If all this talk about Dudley has got you thinking about how to join, it’s super easy!

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All the information you need is at this link, from the Co-op info-session/vibe-check dinners to the FAQs. The next dinner is on May 2 from 11am-12:15pm ET, so sign up on the website quick!

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And if you can’t make it to a dinner or want to chat with some residential Dudley Tutors for a virtual lay-of-the-land, email Co-op Tutor Julia Harris (juliaharris@g.harvard.edu) and Dudley's Undergraduate Administrator Carvina Williams (ududley@fas.harvard.edu). Maybe you’ll find yourself part of the tight-knit Dudley Co-op next semester!

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CORRECTIONS: May 5, 2021

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A previous version of this article misstated that all students living off-campus or outside the Harvard House system are members of the Dudley community. In fact, only some are.

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The previous version also misstated the number of students in the Dudley community. There are roughly 30 spots, split about evenly between the Sacramento Street and Massachusetts Avenue Co-op sites.

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It also misstated the name of the dean overseeing the Dudley community. It is Dean Laura Chivers.

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Flyby’s Spring 2021 Playlist

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{shortcode-9dfce15d40cd39706df537dbf1b8ddd5f9bfa191}If you’re looking for some tunes to bop to as you study for finals (or as you procrastinate studying for finals), listen to Flyby’s most recent playlist to put you in the spring mood even if it won’t stop raining outside.

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Good luck and have fun!

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Xoxo, flyby

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P.S. If you prefer some non-lyrical tunes for actual studying (think lofi-esque), listen to our previous playlist here!

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_

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/

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/

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/

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/

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/

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', [, ])

Virtual Reading Period: Ideas for On and Off Campus

('

{shortcode-646937af3f99cce8ee0b308f7febf407b0020cd6}Another semester has Zoomed by, and it’s now Reading Period! After so many months of online lectures and eyestrain, the end is near. Now that you’ve deleted all your classes from your G-Cal (the satisfaction!), here are a few suggestions on how to spend the next seven days before final exams take over your life.

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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

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Take an afternoon off and visit one of the most beloved art museums in Boston, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. If you’re living on campus, you can take the M2 for free, and there is no admission fee for those carrying a Harvard ID. If you’re still not convinced, the museum is a prime spot to take your next Instagram picture, or at least post on your story to let your acquaintances know that you are indeed #cultured.

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Arnold Arboretum

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The Arnold Arboretum is a free public park in Boston and is a wonderful place to get away from your laptop screen for a while. Plus, being surrounded by nature is known to reduce unpleasant feelings such as stress and fear, and with so many deadlines around the corner, who doesn’t need that? For the poor souls with an organic chemistry final coming up, the greenery is definitely more aesthetically pleasing than the carbon ring structures you’ve been staring at defeatedly all semester.

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Spa and Movie Night

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Maybe you’re not living in Cambridge, or you simply don’t have the motivation to change out of your pajamas. If you fall within these categories, you can spend a night indoors spoiling yourself with face masks, mani-pedis, and several hours of Ginny & Georgia (which is officially renewed for a second season!!!). Although this activity can be fun with friends, both over Zoom and in person, it’s also a great opportunity to have some alone time and unwind before due dates hit you like a truck.

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Virtual Dance Workouts

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It’s been so long since you’ve put on a cute dress and your favorite heels for a fancy formal, but a global pandemic can’t stop you from moving to the beat. Follow along to one of the many energetic YouTube dance workout videos and release those endorphins! However, if dancing (or working out) isn’t really your thing, you can alternatively complete a quiet yoga session.

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Study!

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Of course, during a regular year, Reading Period is beloved for the lavish formals and off-campus excursions, but hence the name, it’s also time to hit the books. If you want to escape a bit at the same time, you can bring all your class materials to a park and work under the warm sun. You’ll thank yourself next week if you get a jump start on your final projects and practice exams.

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Luckily, this week will most likely be the last virtual Reading Period you’ll experience. As you spend the next few days studying, remember to take breaks frequently and to get enough sleep — you got this, queen.

', [])

6 Things to Do Instead of Paying Attention in Class

('

{shortcode-ec5b2fe0b57ebe25b2ba908a6a0add6b525f6983}One of the downsides of online learning (besides every single thing about it), is that it opens up a world of distractions. You are sitting in front of your computer, and as you start to zone out of the lecture, you decide to just open up another browser or go on your phone. The fact that it is so easy to get away with this makes it even easier to distract yourself. So, why not just embrace this newfound freedom and flex your multitasking skills as the semester comes to an end? (Fun fact: I wrote this article during one of my classes — talk about life imitates art!)

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Work on a Paper

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You know that 12 page paper you have to write for your GenEd class that you haven’t started yet? Yeah, the one that’s due tomorrow. Well, now is as good as time as any to get started on it. Don’t let your education get in the way of your, well, education. Use this time that you are forced to sit in front of your computer to try and see how many pages you can pump out in 75 minutes for that essay. You’ll be staring at your screen anyway so if your professor or TF glances at you, they will still see that same dead, empty look in your eyes staring at the camera as if you had been paying attention in class the whole time.

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Use Your Phone

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Chances are whenever you are in class your phone is somewhere close to you. We both know that you are itching to check who’s texted you or to take a quick scroll through Instagram. Why fight the pull when you can just embrace it and swap your laptop screen for your phone screen, especially since you are now much less likely to get caught being on your phone. You can try and hold your phone up to your laptop screen so that to everyone else you look like you are looking at your camera and not stalking your ex’s new boo on Instagram.

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Online Shopping

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With Covid rampaging the streets, you may not feel completely comfortable with hitting up your favorite stores and revamping your wardrobe. It’s a good thing we live in a world where you don’t have to go shopping when shopping can just come to you. Go ahead and check out those flash sales and max out your bank account. Not that it matters much anyway since you have nowhere to wear your cute new outfits because you’re in your room 24/7, but you could start getting an outfit ready for your first post-Covid soiree.

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Play Online Games

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We have all zoomed through the limited range of online games that exist during our Zoom socials. Sometimes desperate times call for desperate measures, so if you are looking for some form of entertainment, go back to the classics. If you want to heighten the experience, Zoom chat a friend to join you in a quick game of skribbl.io or even Among Us. There’s nothing quite like murdering your friends and random strangers on the internet in the middle of your physics class.

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Read Flyby Articles

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On the one hand, if you want to do some online reading, you could use this time to catch up on important current events, especially since so much has been going on in the world lately. But on the other hand, you could also open up Flyby and read about the Harvard Houses as Taylor Swift albums. I mean, that could also be considered an important current event, right? In my unbiased opinion, Flyby provides some of the best entertaining reading to get you through your 9 a.m. lecture.

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Watch Netflix

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For the risk-takers, tune into your favorite Netflix show during class. If you’re going to watch something on your laptop for 75 minutes, might as well make it entertaining. You might not want to hear the harmonious sound of your professor and the characters on the show speaking at the same time, so you will probably have to mute the show (...or the class). Fortunately, you have subtitles so you can read and follow along with your professor’s voice providing some melodic background music.

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Will your grades drop? Probably. Will you end up confused about what’s going on in the rest of the course? Possibly. Will you walk away from class feeling refreshed and energized from doing something fun (excluding writing your paper if that’s not your cup of tea)? Definitely. Even though the benefits may outweigh the drawbacks, it might be best to tune into your lecture once in a while so you have some idea of what’s going on. You might as well get your tuition money’s worth!

', [])

We Solved the Class of 2025 Housing Problem

('

{shortcode-a6fe4672741de01cf035ba29db4e48c7e75e8686} The incoming Class of 2025 might have conquered the lowest admission rate in the history of Harvard College, but thanks to quarantine leaving more than 57,000 high school seniors just bored enough to apply — 15,000 more than in previous years — the low rate still translates into a whole lot of first years. Add to that the 349 students in the Class of 2024 who escaped a year of Zoom by deferring their admission last year, and the College now faces the challenge of accommodating way too many wide-eyed first years in potentially way too little campus housing.

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Unless Harvard plans to move from socially-distanced pandemic-era singles to packing first years into Greenough like sardines, it’s going to need to rework its housing situation fast. Luckily, Flyby is here to help. Dean Khurana, here are a few suggestions to consider as you plan for the fall:

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The New Science and Engineering Complex

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Yeah, the trek to Allston won’t be ideal for first years on their way to Annenberg, but the STEM kids will be right at home. Besides being the newest building on campus, the SEC offers dozens of state-of-the-art lab spaces — what could sound more cozy than that? Like in most dorms in the Yard and the River Houses (Quad pride), first years in the SEC will still have to sleep side-by-side with rodents, but at least the lab mice can be classically conditioned to stop scampering across the room all night.

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Cabot Library Second Floor

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Let’s not act like people didn’t already pull all-nighters here. Truly ideal for all of the incoming STEM babies: Annenberg is 20 steps away, the stairs serve as a built-in gym, and the floor to ceiling windows give an unbeatable view of the sunrise over the Yard. Everything serves a double purpose, including the pset buddies who double as snuggle buddies on those chilly Boston winter nights. All the amenities you need within a 20-step radius makes Cabot Library prime real estate.

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The “Totally Not Haunted” Rooms Above Annenberg

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We’re still not entirely sure what these rooms are used for, but living in a 19th century High Victorian Gothic tower sounds like step one of being in a horror movie. With a creaky elevator and countless dusty stained glass windows, even the smell of Red’s very, very, very Best Catch from downstairs might not be enough to ward away the ghosts. Still, first years living up here will be first in line for breakfast every morning and get the most spacey, historic rooms on campus. And after all, what is a ghost but a bonus roommate?

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Houseboats (Dormboats?) on the Charles

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Row, row, row your dorm gently down the stream! Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, why’s the water green? 🤢

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Observatories On Top of The Science Center

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A step away from Cabot Library, the Loomis-Michael Observatory dorms would epitomize the home/work divide. Surrounded by metal, first-years will feel right at home in the warm ambiance. The views are out of this world (literally) — just mind the giant telescope as you toss and turn. The only downside here is the influx of Insta pics of the observatory sky views.

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Quad Lawn

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Remember those giant white tents that started popping up at college campuses at the beginning of the pandemic? Hear us out, Harvard’s 18th first-year dorm: Quad Lawn. All it takes is a large tent and some inflatable beds, and we’ll have the new 10-man (heating not included). It will fit right in with the rest of the not-on-the-Yard Union dorms, so the UC won’t have to worry about extra council representation. FOP-pers will, of course, get first-dibs on this year-long outdoor adventure.

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Recreating HUDS Dishes: Chocolate Desserts Edition

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{shortcode-b11c2958527d50edff3b95d009e8c39c6cc2b159}With many of us off campus (and others heading out for the summer in just a few short weeks), you might be missing some of HUDS most iconic sugary sweets. So, no matter how long you’ve been off campus (or if you’ve never been on campus 😔), we’ve got the recipes to recreate some delicious selections from the HUDS dessert offerings to satisfy your sweet tooth! So grab some friends, procrastinate studying for that final paper, have a virtual baking party, and try out these slices of chocolate heaven (in our humble opinion).

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Disclaimer: May or may not cause excessive amounts of serotonin and general happiness.

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Double Chocolate-Chip Cookies

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I’ve heard legends of the HUDS Cookie Bar and the local hotspot Insomnia Cookies’ chocolate chip cookies. If you’re looking to recreate this alleged chocolatey goodness for some late night munchies as you work on your pset or essay, check out this recipe to make your own massive chocolate chunky, drool-worthy cookies.

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Ingredients

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1 ½ cups all-purpose flour (leveled and sieved)

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10 tablespoons margarine or butter (this seems a lot, but it is the KEY to the recipe)

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¾ cups sugar (alter to your liking)

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1 tablespoon cocoa powder (can be increased for maximum chocolatey-ness)

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1 teaspoon vanilla extract

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1 large egg (must be large)

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A pinch of salt (alter with finger/pinch size)

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½ tablespoon baking soda

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½ cup chocolate chips (both white and semi-sweet dark chips)

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⅔ cups of peanut butter (optional, but you will not regret it)

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Cold milk (for drinking, if you take warm milk — no)

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Directions

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Preheat the oven to 190 degrees Celsius (375 degrees for all of you Daniel Fahrenheit followers). Butter a flat baking pan then line with parchment paper, leaving a few centimeters hanging off the two sides of the pan (you do the centimeters to inches conversion for once, this international student is tired). Sieve the flour and mix in the dry ingredients — salt, baking soda, and cocoa powder. In a different bowl, cream the butter and add in the sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy (two to three minutes if using a mixture and five to six minutes if using a hand whisk). Add in the vanilla extract, peanut butter, and eggs, cracking the eggs in a separate bowl and adding them in one by one.

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Mix the dry and wet ingredients, adding the dry to the wet in three batches. Incorporate in all the flour, then add in chocolate chips and mix gently with a spatula until evenly mixed into the dough.

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Option 1:

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Roll out the dough using some extra flour and cut out shapes with a cookie cutter.

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(Much Easier) Option 2:

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Using your hands, make small balls and flatten them using a spatula or a fork for a cool criss-cross design. Put cookies on baking pan and bake for 20-25 minutes or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Let cool (optional), remove from baking pan, and serve with COLD milk.

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Of course, feel free to alter the recipe to your liking, be it taking them with warm milk or using less butter. We recommend you enjoy these desserts while watching either “The Kissing Booth 2” because Netflix likes to portray Harvard in a very interesting way (do Harvard dorm rooms actually have fireplaces?) or ‘The Princess Switch 2” (spoiler: it’s horrible) because finals are sad and I need to ignore my problems with rom-coms. Happy baking!

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Chocolate Whoopie Pie

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Sweet chocolate cake paired with a vanilla frosting filling, what could be a more satisfying dessert for your sweet tooth? There is no better way to fill your time procrastinating your psets or studying for finals than baking this scrumptious dessert — while you're at it, why not bake some extras as a sweet surprise for friends and family!

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Ingredients

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Batter

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2 cups all-purpose flour

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1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, sifted

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1 1/4 tsp. baking soda

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1/2 tsp. salt

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1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

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1 cup granulated sugar

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1 large egg

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1 tsp. vanilla extract

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1 cup milk

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Filling

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1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened

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4 cups powdered sugar

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1/2 tsp vanilla extract

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3–4 tbsp milk

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Directions

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To make these scrumptious sweets, first you must combine the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt in a bowl. In a separate bowl, cream together the butter and sugar. Then mix in the egg and vanilla extract, and slowly combine with the milk. Once you have done this, add in your previously mixed dry ingredients to make the chocolaty batter.

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Using a cookie scoop or a spoon, scoop out the batter and place on a parchment lined cookie sheet. Bake this for 10 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. While the cake portion of the dessert is baking, beat together the butter, sugar, vanilla extract, and milk to make the filling.

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Once the cakes are fully cooked and cooled, pipe the buttercream filling onto the cake mounds, and then sandwich two together to make a delectable chocolate whoopie pie similar to the ones HUDS serves. I guarantee if you eat these during your last few Zoom classes of the semester, you will make all your classmates jealous that you have such a delicious dessert to enjoy!

', [])

Rest In Peace, Finance Bro Patagonias

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{shortcode-57563a9974c2fa0e0e3dfe07f433e3b115e43f6b}Did you feel a shift in the universe as you donned your favorite salmon-shorts-plus-Canada-Goose prep casual combo? As of last week, a major perk of joining one of Harvard’s many consulting and consulting-adjacent clubs was phased out of production. That’s right, econ concentrators — Patagonia announced plans to “transition away” from adding additional non-removable logos to its products, citing that additional logos decrease the lifespan of garments and end up in landfills far too soon. Clearly the future of fintech casual is in jeopardy.

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It’s honestly super insensitive of Pata to prioritize the planet. I mean, how the hell are we supposed to announce that we passed a ~selective~ comp without, like, actually announcing it? The fleeces were so subtle and definitely did not have mega-douchey connotations. But, hey, there’s a bright side to this dreadful news! Now, the UC can spend its money on something useful — like, literally anything useful would be nice, guys.

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So, since there’s basically no reason to comp HCCG, HFAC, HUCP, and HFUCK without the Wall Street staple, we’ve gone to the trouble of brainstorming (free of charge!) a few replacement swag items to help our favorite finance clubs stick around.

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It’s Time To Level Up

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Patagonia might’ve moved on, but there’s no chance Canada Goose will be making similar moves any time soon. Just think of how slick a Black Diamond x Canada Goose puffy would look, y’all. (I mean, we’re not sure if you guys are still doing the whole paying-$1000-to-be-in-a-club-thing, but if you are, an extra jacket should be no sweat…)

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Loopholes, Baby

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Sure, Patagonia is nixing additional non-removable logos, but what about removable logos? The vision: a tier system within the Patagonias themselves. Clubs could rip off the Girl Scouts and make removable patches indicating whether you’re a New Recruit, Super Legit Analyst Guy, Portfolio Emperor, or what have you.

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Branded Razor Scooters

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We know your GCals are horrifyingly stacked, so consider the free advertising / flex of a shiny Razor scooter bearing your finance club’s insignia as you rush from one building to the next on the absolute Chad of campus transport.

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A Biodegradable Windbreaker

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It slowly decays over time — just like your morals!

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While we’re sad to see the beloved branded Patagonia go, we’re excited to see how the clubs of Harvard adapt to the challenge! Go get ’em, y’all!

', [])

Flyby Everywhere: Tag Yourself, International Edition

('

{shortcode-d651e93a439992f30d995cd024854ff6caead397}I can say with absolute certainty (and a pinch of bias) that international students bring a lot of unique, special qualities to Harvard, from their interesting accents, beautiful languages and time zone issues. Whether you're from the States or not, though, there are International quirks that align with just abou everybody. Check out this tag yourself to find out what aspects of the international student experience speak to you the most!{shortcode-742d1e3c1eec7116ded1c570797c5b32c2c9e592}

', [, ])

What Harvard Students Say vs. What They Mean

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{shortcode-4ee33f6dced6f1c1c0eefa4e6e96863c7f92854d}When you arrive at Harvard, you might be unaware of the distinct phrases students say that have a different meaning than their literal definitions. It is a learned language that one has to assimilate to; however, once you get the hang of it, you never forget it. Webster—I mean—Flyby has your definitions ready!

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Harvard student: Omg! We have to grab lunch/coffee/dinner/boba [insert another meal or edible treat] one day!

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Translation: I know we’re acquaintances but I’d really like this interaction to end. We will never follow up on this proposition.

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Harvard student: Omg I was studying so late last night. I only got five hours of sleep.

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Other student: Omg, I only got two!

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Translation: I want to seem busier than you.

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Harvard student: My family’s not rich, but I’d say we’re comfortable.

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Translation: I’m freaking loaded!

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Harvard Student: I’m from 30 minutes outside of New York City!

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Translation: I’m from Connecticut!

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Harvard Student: To jump off of [student in class]’s point…..

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Translation: I didn’t do the readings, but I need participation points.

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As the semester comes to a close, I am excited to have a break from Harvard language over the summer. However, these unspoken meanings of communication are one of many factors that bring the student body together, and I’m sure I’ll end up missing these slightly annoying Harvard-isms in a few weeks! <3

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