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Science

HMS Gordon Hall
Health

HMS and Broad Institute Researchers Discover First Strong Genetic Link to Bipolar Disorder

A research team including scientists at Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard reported the first strong genetic risk factor for bipolar disorder in a study published in the journal Nature Genetics on April 1.

SEAS Complex Exterior Yard
Research

Harvard-led Research Team Receives Department of Defense Award

The Department of Defense awarded its Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative prize to a team of researchers led by Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences professor Katia Bertoldi for the team’s work studying origami structures.

Sheila Jasanoff Awarded the Holberg Prize
Harvard Kennedy School

Harvard Kennedy School Professor Sheila Jasanoff ’64 Awarded Prestigious Holberg Prize

Harvard Kennedy School professor Sheila S. Jasanoff received the 2022 Holberg Prize, which is described by some as the “Nobel Prize for social science and humanities.” Jasanoff will be officially presented with the award on June 9 during a ceremony in Norway.

School of Public Health
Research

HSPH Researchers Determine Epstein-Barr Virus to be Primary Cause of Multiple Sclerosis

In a longitudinal study over two decades in the making, researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the central nervous system, is “likely caused” by infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).

Jefferson Lab Evacuation
Science

Harvard Researchers Verify Existence of New State of Matter, Opens Doors for Quantum Science

The state of matter, known as quantum spin liquid, has special properties that produce long-range quantum entanglement — a phenomenon in which particles’ states are connected despite spatial separation.

Brigham and Women's Hospital
Health

BWH Researchers Launch First-Ever Human Trial for Alzheimer’s Nasal Vaccine

Brigham and Women’s Hospital will begin treating patients this week in the first human trial for a nasal vaccine to prevent and slow Alzheimer’s disease.

School of Public Health
Harvard Medical School

HSPH Announces Collaboration with Tsinghua Vanke School of Public Health in China

Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health announced a new academic and research collaboration with Tsinghua University’s Vanke School of Public Health in Beijing in a press release on Wednesday.

HMSC Museum Opening
Museums

Visitors Laud Science and Culture Museums’ Public Reopening

After an extended shutdown due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the Harvard Museums of Science and Culture and its programs reopened to both Harvard affiliates and the general public last week.

Understanding Long Covid event
Research

Patients, Physicians Discuss Challenges of Long Covid in HSPH Panel

Medical experts and patients discussed the challenges associated with treating and studying long Covid in an event hosted by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on Friday afternoon.

SEAS Sign
Research

Harvard Researchers Find Ancient Earth Faced Severe Rainstorms Amid High Temperatures

Earth was once inundated by episodic cycles of heavy rainstorms followed by severe droughts, according to Harvard Environmental Science and Engineering researchers.

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Research

Whole Grain Intake Linked to Lower Liver Cancer Risk, Harvard Researchers Discover

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers found an association between high whole grain and fiber intake and a lower risk of liver cancer and chronic liver disease mortality.

Weather
Research

Radcliffe Fellow Discusses Animal Attachments in ‘Biology of Intimacy’ Talk

Radcliffe fellow Steven Phelps, a professor of integrative biology at the University of Texas at Austin, discussed his research on intimate attachments between animals during a presentation Wednesday afternoon.

Peabody Museum
Research

Harvard Study Finds Human Resting Metabolic Rate Has Declined Since 1830

The human resting metabolic rate and levels of physical activity have declined in the United States since 1830, according to a recent study by researchers in Harvard’s Department of Human Evolutionary Biology.

Ancient Crabs
Research

Amber Fossil Shows Crabs Lived on Land Earlier than Previously Thought

Non-marine crabs began to live on land at least 100 million years ago, according to recently published research by evolutionary biologists, including Javier Luque, a researcher at the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology.

Ancient Crabs
Research

Ancient Crabs

Amber recovered from the jungles of Southeast Asia by Harvard postdoctoral researcher Javier Luque and his team provided new insights into what is now believed to be the oldest modern-looking crustacean species, Cretapsara athanata.

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