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Federal Privacy Law Should Protect All of Us, Not Just Judges

The Daniel Anderl Judicial Security and Privacy Act has dipped its toes into the muddy waters of online data exposure. It protects very few. But we can start here at Harvard by making sure our privacy policies actually protect us. We can speak up and advocate for a federal privacy law that protects not just a few, but all.

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Harvard’s Paradox of Exclusive Inclusivity

I will never fully understand why an institution like Harvard, so exclusive and inaccessible, continues to dominate global discussions surrounding equity and justice. But I do know that some pills are tough to swallow: in this case, that the oppressive structures we read about, write about, and criticize in our classrooms are the same ones that brought many of us to this campus.

Black History Month
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Harvard is Closing its Doors to Those That Built It

Rather than this raising a question of whether Black immigrants are deserving of their hard-earned seats at these elite institutions (which is not even up for discussion), I wish to call on Harvard to recognize their failure at ensuring the representation of Generational African American descendants of slavery.

Black History Month
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Black Athleticism Leading Liberation

When we become dominant, we cannot be silenced, we cannot be ignored, and we cannot be erased. Patrick Mahomes and Jalen Hurts leading this Super Bowl is a win beyond football, and we must continue to make strides for Black people through this medium.

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Studying Abroad

At Harvard, we are constantly prompted to make the most of our time here: chase every opportunity, travel, meet as many people as possible, engage with a neverending list of communities. As we endeavor to exhaust the possibilities that our four years in college present, we recraft our definitions of home and find our chosen families. Yet we often lose sight of the implicit tradeoffs we make with the worlds we leave behind.

Black History Month
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What February 14 Means to Me

For me, this means commemorating Fredrick Douglass’s Birthday, celebrating the interracial, queer love that created my family this Valentine’s Day, and always remembering how thankful I am for the Black leaders that fought for my ability to be where I am today. As for the rest of the month, let the love flow freely.

Black History Month
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A Valentine For A Young Black Artist

This love poem is inspired by the great Phillis Wheatley, the first published Black poet in America. Wheatley was a child when she was taken from her home in West Africa to Boston. She won her freedom in the fall of 1773, and continued to write beautiful poetry until her death 11 years later.

Black History Month
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Florida’s Attack on Education Should Ring Alarm Bells at Harvard

It’s one thing to support robust academic free speech. It’s another to reject legitimate history because you disagree with it. Anti-intellectualism is the letter of the law in the state of Florida. This should set off alarm bells for anyone who cares about academic freedom.

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Scientists Must Only Seek Truth

Scientists have a unique power to unveil the deepest truths about our physical and natural world. In the world of academic research, the only goal should be to obtain truth — we should never let honesty fall second to the pursuit of personal gain.

Black History Month
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Taking This Month to Show Gratitude for Blackness

In brainstorming what I could write about this month, I found myself constantly thinking, “That’s too basic” or “I don’t have anything new to say.” Then I realized: Why write about something new at all? I could simply write about the things that I loved about Blackness.

Students in Smith Campus Center
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Harvard Needs A Nap

The reality is that students don’t sleep as much as they need to. Instead of hoping the problem will fix itself, it’s time for Harvard to take action to bring students what they need: nap pods.

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South Asians, Police Abolition Is Your Responsibility Too

We should know that we would not be able to live comfortably in this country without the civil rights movement that in many ways fought against police brutality, just as Black Lives Matter does today. We can clearly articulate the problems of corruption and violence that exist in our motherlands, but why do we often fail to do so in the United States?

Black History Month
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How Christian Hip-Hop Saved My Life

When my Christianity — constantly threatened by cultural assimilation and the transgression of someone else’s social norms — is nearly lost, Christian hip-hop acts as a surgical knife, dividing between the beautiful and the ugly, putting me and my faith back together again.

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Why It’s Important to Break Down Paywalls

Rather than treating publicly shared research as a commodity, journals should consider removing paywalls to make education more equitable. Everybody deserves the opportunity to engage with the cutting edge of human ingenuity, and removing paywalls is an important first step in that direction.

Black History Month
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BFFR.

It isn’t difficult to solicit the perspective of the people whose culture is being appropriated before promoting a product or homogenizing a new phrase. And to those that tell us that that’s too much to ask, I say… Be f-cking for real.

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