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Op Eds

Op Eds

The Case for 7 More Minutes

We can and should resist the inexorable pull to systematize everything. It is time to consciously give ourselves the grace of 7 minutes before letting the gravity of a situation set in.

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Freshman Flu? We Can Do More than Joke About It.

Given the prevalence of the “freshman flu,” a more comprehensive orientation event and guide to handling sickness as a Harvard first-year seem a worthwhile project.

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Single-Payer Healthcare is Sense, Not Socialism

To all those who dispute a single-payer health system on the grounds that it is uneconomical, or inefficient: Your arguments have been refuted time and time again, by scholars and experts more knowledgeable than us both. I can only say one additional thing to try to change your mind. I will have to put this man’s cold, stiff, bare dead body in a body bag and take him to the morgue. You will not.

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Don’t Stand For Today’s PSC Speaker Event

We are dismayed to see our peers bring Mohammed El-Kurd to speak to our campus. We find their willingness to invite such a noxious figure into our midst appalling. Thou shalt not stand idly by.

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The Privilege of Not Having to Be Afraid

Navigating a still slightly unknown city without fear is a privilege — one that usually isn’t afforded to students who identify as women or are femme-presenting.

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On Decolonization, African Countries and a Postcolonial Nairobi

The Africa the rest of the world fantasizes about is not the Africa that exists in reality. Africa is evolving on its own path, and it is high time the rest of the world contends with this.

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Make Sleep A Gem Again

The faculty of the Sleep Gen Ed and members of the Committee on General Education have a choice: to join the revolution of rest or to succumb to the system. In a pile of cold, hard stones, Sleep can be a gem again.

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More than Just Fabric: Freedom, through Mahsa Amini’s Road to Revolution

The women’s movement in Iran runs much deeper than a piece of cloth covering the hair. It is rooted in a long-brewing exhaustion with authoritarian regimes that continue to deny women freedom and agency. Mahsa Amini’s death and the protests that have erupted in response are not a demonstration against Islam, but rather, the broader issue of policing a woman’s ability to choose — to choose to wear the hijab, however one pleases.

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Leave the Infographic Girlies Alone

I’ll admit it — it’s disquieting when I open Instagram only to be hit with my younger sister’s friends posting about genocide, especially since I have only ever used Instagram for aimless pleasure. But the purpose and presence of social media is evolving. We cannot deny that many people have fallen victim to a habit of scrolling through slews of followers’ photos and videos on the daily. Maybe infographics are just the start of a movement to make social media platforms more meaningful.

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The Right to Choose

I believe myself to be in a constant state of protest. The minute I step out of my room wearing my hijab, I am shouting my beliefs out to the world. Despite the skeptical glances and occasional temptations, my desire to feel spiritually connected through my hijab is enough to spur me on against its potential dangers.

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The News Isn’t Objective — and It Shouldn’t Be

Journalism can retain its mission of creating informed, active members of society without attempting to be objective in the strictly-defined present sense.

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Harvard Must Work to Bridge the Politics-People Divide

An insular Harvard helps no one but its direct affiliates, but a Harvard whose institutions embody humility and open-mindedness has the capacity to pacify some of our country’s deepest and most destructive fault lines.

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El Acento de mi Mamá

Accents tell a story that we will never begin to understand unless we listen. Our general impatience for those who speak differently burns the bridge between their unique perspectives and our own. And let’s not forget that Hispanic accents typically mean that person knows at least two languages — more than the average American.

Iranian Women Rally Mahsa Amini Photo
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Woman, Life, Freedom: The Time for Harvard to Support Iranians is Now

Throughout Iran, calls of “Jin, Jiyan, Azadi” or “Zan, Zendegi, Azadi” ring not only in the streets but in the halls of schools and universities. Instead of echoing these calls for “Woman, Life, Freedom,” Harvard University President Lawrence S. Bacow has remained silent in the face of student demands for an expression of solidarity.

Hispanic Heritage Month logo
Op Eds

El Miedo a lo Desconocido: Overcoming My Fear of Change as a Mexican-American Student at Harvard

Growing up, my family always reminded me that there’s beauty in the unknown; something that is new isn’t necessarily something to be afraid of.

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