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Oldies But Goodies

Harvard in 1920

Two artillery guns flanked the Widener Library steps, "in order that visitors of the College, new students and men contemplating the ROTC course" might gain some experience of Harvard's military department. It was September 25, 1920—less than two years after the end of World War I—and the military remained very much a part of the Harvard experience.

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Oldies But Goodies

Harvard in 1910

A peek inside the bound volumes of The Crimson shows how a picture of life at Harvard in 1910 very different from the Harvard experience one hundred years later. Rising seniors, for example, applied for housing in Holworthy, Hollis, and Thayer for their final year at Harvard — and shortly afterwards, everyone's rooming assignments were posted on the front page of The Crimson.

Oldies But Goodies

Harvard in 1900

As reunion week approaches at the College, thousands of alumni from dozens of different classes will flock to the Harvard campus. But it's a safe bet to say that no one will be around from the class of 1901. Even without these would-be 130-year-old alumni, The Crimson archives are still here to offer us a brief window into the world of Harvard 110 years ago—the news, the coverage, and the quirks.

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On Campus

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Much of the equipment used by the Harvard Lecture Demonstrations Team is stored in their prep room located in the Science Center.

On Campus

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A small sample of the Harvard Lecture Demonstrations Team's collection is stored in their prep room.

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Exams Circa 1860

Have you ever wondered what Harvard exams were like centuries ago? Though one might expect that these exams have been lost to the ages, they have, in fact, been collected in the depths of Pusey Library. In order to uncover the sort of questions Harvard students had to answer as they sat for exams in the past, this Flyby correspondent ventured into the Harvard University Archives, looked through exams dating back to around 150 years ago, and compiled some of the more interesting questions below.

The Game

Harvard University Archives Acquires Vuvuzela

Though vuvuzelas were banned before having an opportunity to potentially become a Game Day tradition, they won’t soon be forgotten given that the Harvard University Archives added a vuvuzela to its permanent collection earlier this month.

Archives

PRESIDENT LOWELL WIRES GENERAL SCOTT TO SECURE IMMEDIATE ESTABLISHMENT OF RESERVE OFFICERS' UNIT.

February 3, 1917. General Hugh L. Scott, Washington, D. C. Cannot amendment of regulations as proposed by War Department be

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